Why Emotional Intelligence is Your Best Weapon

From his attitude to women and authority to his uncompromising ways of achieving his targets – usually alone, against protocol and violently – James Bond’s relevance is always under question.

Which is maybe why Daniel Craig talking about the current Bond film, Spectre, and it’s main man said: “I don’t know if I’d like to spend too much time with him.”

Indeed, just the other day it was reported that Bond’s old school – albeit briefly – Eton College is changing its approach to teaching its pupils. New headmaster, Simon Henderson:

“…wants to develop emotional intelligence in his pupils and provide them with a “holistic, rounded” education.”

He went on to say:

“The whole point of school is to prepare young people for happiness and success in their personal lives and working lives… There’s more awareness of emotional intelligence and of mental health, of young people building confidence and resilience to manage themselves in a fast-changing, challenging environment.”

So, emotional intelligence, also known as EI or EQ is vital to thriving not just surviving in today’s ever changing business landscape.

Author and business guru Stephen Covey, best known for his classic The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, divided emotional intelligence into 5 components:

Self-Awareness — An ability to reflect on your life, develop self-knowledge, and use that knowledge to improve
Personal Motivation — Knowing what really excites you. The visions, values, goals, hopes, desires and passions that make up your priorities
Self-Regulation — Managing yourself and achieve your vision and values
Empathy — The ability to see how other people see and feel about things
Social Skills — Effectively resolving differences, solving problems, producing creative solutions and interacting optimally to further joint purposes

And, there’s great news. There’s no correlation between IQ and EQ scores!

Unlike IQ and personality traits emotional intelligence can be developed and improved by learning and practising new skills.

Want to find out how your EQ skills rate?

The Greater Good Science Center run by the University of California, Berkeley has an online emotional intelligence quiz you can take here: http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/ei_quiz/

Want to improve your EQ meet new people and learn more stuff all at once?

The School of Life say they are:
“… devoted to developing emotional intelligence through the help of culture.”
You can even enrol with the school for a year and undertake an EQ certificate!

Want to take a practical approach to improving your EQ?

How about volunteering? Take a look at the UK’s national volunteering database Do-it.org which lists over 1m volunteering opportunities across the UK.

Social responsibility is one of the highest levels of emotional experience. It demonstrates that you are not solely invested in personal gain and that you really care about others.

Just remember to add it to your CV!

What Next?:

We’d love to hear your ideas and insights around emotional intelligence!

Any particular issues or insights? Need help? Let us know!

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