Finding a Job to Suit You

This Q&A Wednesday we’re talking: finding a job to fit you.

Remember that Derek Zoolander reflection in a teaspoon moment?:

“I remember thinking ‘wow, you’re ridiculously good looking, maybe you could do that for a career.’”

But often, knowing what we’re cut out for isn’t so clear. If you’re looking for a new position it seems logical to match your skills to the job descriptions you’re interested in. But, it’s also vital to match your personality and aspirations to a potential role too.

Working in a job you love greatly increases your chances of long-term career success and satisfaction, so it’s important to make the right decision. Here, our Angel consultants shed some light on finding that Cinderella slipper of a role. Tweet: Here, our Angel consultants shed some light on finding that Cinderella slipper of a role. @Angel_HR_UK #QAngel http://goo.gl/H5a9vh

1.What’s the first thing we should do to find a job to suit us?
I’d say, ask yourself what you don’t enjoy about your current job. Get specific: was it the role, your team, the organisation, or the sector you didn’t get on with?

2. So, once we really know what we don’t like. What’s next?
Create your role wishlist. What do you want, ideally? Consider key elements, like: the people you’d work with, the organisation’s working style, your aims, and so on.

3. But, wishlists and jobs don’t always go together…
Right. The wishlist is just a guide – what we wish for in its most obvious form isn’t always that great in reality. For example, you might love food, so you think, I’ll be chef, but actually you’re not your best under pressure and multitasking, so you need to approach it another way: is it the quality of food production you’re interested in, or marketing great restaurants, or even nutrition? That’s why you need to know your values too. Mindtools has a great guide to determining your values.

4. What can our values do for us?
Values act as a kind of career, or life, compass. When you understand your values you can evaluate businesses and roles on whether they support those values. Tweet: When you understand your values you can evaluate businesses and roles on whether they support those values. @Angel_HR_UK #QAngel http://goo.gl/H5a9vh
5. You mean don’t look at job titles?
Well, choosing roles by job title, and even company, can be misleading. So, try focusing on job ingredients. If one of your values is ‘creativity’ you might not get much out of being an administrator, even in a creative business, if it’s not a varied role.

6. What about passions?
Being passionate about anything is great, however, Tom McDermott of Igniting Curiosity believes that this thinking is over simplistic. Tom says, finding a job that you love requires doing something you are “passionately curious” about. “By itself, passion will not generate creativity or imagination, nor does it generate new ideas or new discoveries.” Tweet: By itself, passion will not generate creativity or imagination, nor does it generate new ideas or new discoveries. @Angel_HR_UK #QAngel http://goo.gl/H5a9vh
7. How will that help my search for a role to suit me?
According to Global Perspectives the UK ranks about 18th out of 20 countries for employee engagement. Only 37% of UK workers felt they were encouraged to be innovative at work. If you are doing something you are ‘passionately curious’ about somewhere which allows you to be ‘passionately curious’ then you can’t help but be engaged!

8. So, what’s the best way to find out whether a role will really suit me?
Do your research. Don’t get swayed by what other people say – their skills and values are different to yours – go find out for yourself. If you want to take a look at the care sector, for example, speak to job agencies who specialise in that area, like Angel, and see what your consultant has to say – they’ve got a great, unbiased overview of the sector. Or, find industry contacts and mine them for information in return for coffee.

9. What about on-the-job experience?
Work shadowing or interning are obviously well trodden ways to get a glimpse into the kind of work you’re looking to do. You could also try temping – which is especially good if you need to keep earning while you get your experience in your desired role.

10. What about my CV?
If you’re going for a real career change you might feel like your CV doesn’t represent you all that well. So, try formatting it CV differently. If you’re a shop assistant but you want to be a chef, for example, highlight your team working skills, sales achievements, ability to work unsupervised, and so on – all things relevant to your dream career, rather than giving a timeline of shops you’ve worked in upfront. For more information on CVs take a look at our blog HERE.

Now over to you:
Are you working in your dream career? How did you get there? If not, have you got any burning questions on what you’ve read here today? As ever, we want to hear what you’ve got to say!

Some next steps:

Share this post with interested parties
Sign up HERE for more Angel advice & insights
Or, here HERE for Angel’s recruitment service